Fatal Attractions For Ospreys

 

BALING TWINE AND OSPREYS

 

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Loose Twine in Fields 
Photo By Steve Regele

 

 

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Osprey Nest with Twine
Photo By Marco Restani

 

 

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Twine Entangled Nestling
Photo By Marco Restani

 

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Removing Twine Takes Time
Photo By Steve Regele

 

 

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Entangled Nestling Found Dead at Banding
Photo By Marco Restani

 

 

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Ospreys Aren’t the Only Ones to Get Entangled in Twine
Photo By Deb Regele

 

Ospreys love to use twine in their nests.

Loose twine is found along highways, in pastures and in fields.

 

 

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Loose Twine Blown out of Pickups
Photo By Steve Regele

 

Both nestlings and adult Ospreys can become entangled in the twine.

 

 

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Entangled Nestling
Photo by Marco Restani

 

Entangled birds need to be rescued quickly.

 

 

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Twine Needs to be Removed Carefully
Photo By Deb Regele

 

Not all Ospreys are rescued before permanent damage or death has occurred.  

 

 

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Entangled Nestling Found Dead at Banding Photo By Jean Boone

 

Twine is also found in nests of other birds.

 

Ospreys are not the only birds to die from twine entanglement.

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Twine Removed from One Osprey Nest
Photo By Marco Restani

 

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Osprey Nest with Twine
Photo By Deb Regele

 

 

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Entangled Feet
Photo By Marco Restani

 

 

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Right Foot too Swollen to Band
Photo by Marco Restani

 

 

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Raven Nest with Twine
Photo by Deb Regele

 

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Entangled House Sparrow
Photo By Deb Regele

 

 UTILITY POLES AND OSPREYS

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Sticks and Twine Dangle onto Active                  Utility Lines
          Photo By Teus Sterkenberg

 

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        Fire Started by Nesting Material
                   Photo by Teus Sterkenberg

 

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  Yellowstone Valley Electric Installs Baffle
                     Photo By Deb Regele

 

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                      Fire Damage
                    Photo by Teus Sterkenberg

 

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  Male Osprey on Baffle at Old Nesting Site              and Female on the New Nest
                     Photo By Dorothy Bartlett

 

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  Ospreys are Deterred from Nest Building                        by Baffles
                   Photo By Dorothy Bartlett

Ospreys have developed a fondness for building their nests on power poles since their preferred natural nesting site, a tree snag, is seldom found on the landscape.    

              

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    Nests are in Direct Contact with Lines
                       Photo by Steve Regele

 

Power poles can lead to electrocutions and fires that kill Ospreys.

 

Power outages also create major problems for people and utility companies. 

 

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      Eagle Scout Sean Ellis Designed the                              Platform                                             Photo By Deb Regele

 

Yellowstone Valley Audubon Society works with local utility companies to create safer nesting sites for Ospreys and reduce utility problems. 

 

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Yellowstone Valley Electric Sets an       Osprey Pole and Platform
              Photo By Deb Regele

 

After establishing safer nesting sites, utility companies install baffles to discourage Ospreys from returning to the active power poles. 

 

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         Power Lines Vary Between Poles
                          Photo By Deb Regele

 

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   Twine, Sticks, Active Lines and Ospreys
                    Photo By Teus Sterkenberg

 

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 Yellowstone Valley Electric Builds Supports                         for Platform
                          Photo By Deb Regele

 

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    New Nesting Site is Established at the                    Outpost South of Laurel
                          Photo By Deb Regele

 

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        One of Several Types of Baffles
                         Photo By Deb Regele

 

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  Male and Female Osprey on Newly Newly                     Installed Platform
                   Photo By George Mowat

 

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